March 29, 2005 | David F. Coppedge

“Impressive” – the Memory Capabilities of Honeybees

“Over the past decade, work on the honey bee has provided growing evidence that insects are not simple, reflexive creatures,” begins a paper in PNAS by international scientists.1  “The brains of honey bees are very small, but their ability to learn and memorize tasks is impressive.”  (Emphasis added in all quotes.)
    With clever experiments, they put test bees through their paces.  They found them able to discern between relevant and irrelevant clues when lost, findings that “point to a remarkably robust, and yet plastic, working memory in the honey bee.”  See also the 02/15/2005 entry on honeybee mental mapping capabilities.


1Zhang et al., ”Visual working memory in decision making by honey bees,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 10.1073/pnas.0501440102, published online before print March 28, 2005.

Bee aware: among all their expressions of amazement about the capabilities built into such a tiny insect, the authors made no mention of evolution in their paper.  That may sting the Darwinists but create a real buzz elsewhere, honey.

(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)
Categories: Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.