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It’s Over: Dark Energy Was Fake Science

It's being called the Worst Theoretical Prediction in the History of Physics. Dark energy, and its cousin dark matter, are not showing up in any empirical tests.

Is Dark Matter Going the Way of Phlogiston?

There is no exotic dark matter, according to the most sensitive search to date. The ramifications for cosmology are enormous.

Cosmologists Bash Heads Against Reality

When observations don't fit your ideology, invent paranoid delusions.

Entropy in Space Seen at All Scales

Entropy at all scales: clearly seen. Creation of order: not so much.

Cosmic Conundrums

Modern cosmology is in a battle against the observations, and the observations might just win.

Plentiful Water in the Early Universe, and Other Surprises

Based on the following unexpected findings, secular astronomers' ignorance of reality has reached cosmic proportions.

Cosmic Theater

Cosmologists act less like scientists and more like actors, the more that anomalies threaten their paradigm.

Quasar Alignment Is "Spooky"

Quasar rotation axes show a peculiar alignment over billions of light-years.

Dark Matter Search Tinkers with Mythology

They can't find it, but it must be there. How long can that approach be sustained?

Cosmologists Use Natural Selection to Explain Fine-Tuning of the Universe

In a mathematical tour de farce, two Oxford evolutionists have applied Darwinian natural selection to the multiverse to try to explain why it looks designed.

Sun, Moon and Stars in the News

What's up in astronomy? Surprises, by heavens.

Doomed Worlds: Planets Seen Disrupting, Not Forming

Much as astrobiologists would like to see the birth of a new planet, the ones we observe seem to be dying, not being born.

Water, Water Everywhere in Space

The largest mass of water has been found surrounding a black hole in a quasar 12 billion light-years away. Space.com says the cloud harbors “140 trillion times more water than all of Earth’s oceans combined.” The discovery not only that “water has been prevalent in the universe for nearly its entire existence,” but that it “was present only some 1.6 billion years after the beginning of the universe.” Alberto Bolatto, of the University of Maryland, said, "This discovery pushes the detection of water one billion years closer to the Big Bang than any previous find.” In other cosmology news:
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