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Ancient Inscriptions Agree with Bible

Names written on pieces of pottery, clay and stone agree not only that Bible characters existed, but confirms the dates they lived.

Biblical Archaeology Scores Three More Confirmations

Artifacts mentioning Biblical names continue to turn up in the lands of the Bible. One announced this week is the talk of the town.

More Dead Sea Scrolls Found

Two separate articles discuss new findings about the famous Dead Sea Scrolls, the most significant archaeological find of the 20th century.

Kingdom of David and Solomon Supported by Growing Evidence

The evidence is coming together to support the Biblical record of David and Solomon. An Israeli publication updates the latest finds.
Edicule 2006, Church of the Holy Sepulcher

Church of the Holy Sepulcher Repairs Underway

The alleged site of Jesus' burial and resurrection is being opened for the first time in centuries.

Arad Texts Confirm Widespread Literacy in Judah

Analysis of 16 texts written on pottery shards confirm that ordinary people were literate in Old Testament times.

King Hezekiah’s Royal Seal Found in Jerusalem

The royal seal of a Biblical king has been found, stating "belonging to Hezekiah, son of Ahaz, king of Judah" near the Temple Mount.

Biblical Name Found on Pottery

An iron-age pot at a fortress south of Jerusalem is inscribed with the name of King Saul's successor at the time of David.

Biblical Archaeology Still Has Much to Discover

Some exciting discoveries in Jerusalem and other near eastern sites emphasize the fact that archaeologists have much more to explore in the lands of the Bible.

Ancient Text Found in Jerusalem from David's Time

Inscriptions are rare but valuable artifacts in archaeology. Though short and simple, a fragmentary inscription on a jug sets a record as the oldest ever found in Jerusalem, from the era of David and Solomon or before.

Jerusalem Cistern Found from First Temple Era

A huge cistern near the Temple Mount has been found that was part of Solomon's Temple complex.

Is This Plant Really 30,000 Years Old?

A plant said to be 30,000 years old has been brought to life in Russia. A team resurrected a fruit from a rodent burrow in Siberian permafrost, getting it to grow into a whole plant that produces viable seeds. This is now the oldest age claim, by an order of magnitude, for plant material made to live again. Other scientists are startled that plant material could remain viable for so long, since cells have to repair their DNA continually. Other botany news bring different problems to evolutionary theory.
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