October 3, 2008 | David F. Coppedge

Bangin’ Around to Get Something New Under the Sun

You’ve heard of the Big Bang, and the Cambrian Explosion.  Now, to get the solar system started, astronomers have added a Little Bang to move things along in the naturalistic path from nothing to everything.  Science Daily, Space.com and PhysOrg all reprinted a press release from the Carnegie Institution claiming that a nearby supernova led to our solar system.
    Alan Boss thinks he’s gotten the devil out of the details.  A nearby supernova, you see, was needed in the model for two reasons: to get our sun’s birth cloud to gravitationally collapse, and to seed it with isotopes like iron-60, whose short-lived daughter radionuclides are found in some meteorites.  These two requirements did not work well together.  “Until this study,” Boss explained, “scientists have not been able to work out a self-consistent scenario, where collapse is triggered at the same time that newly created isotopes from the supernova are injected into the collapsing cloud.”  By fine-tuning the explosion in his computer model, Alan Boss and team found a way to keep the right ingredients together.
    Students of solar system cosmogony may not have realized that the supernova-shock model was so plagued with difficulties.  A 10-year-old conundrum regarding the need to heat by compression at the same time the cloud cools by radiation “has left serious doubts in the community about whether a supernova shock started these events over four billion years ago or not,” one astronomer commented.  But now, Boss has hope again.  “This is the first time a detailed model for a supernova triggering the formation of our solar system has been shown to work,” he admitted.  “We started with a Little Bang 9 billion years after the Big Bang.”

Well, that just makes our planet even more privileged than ever to have had such a fine-tuned explosion nearby to gently deliver our baby sun.  Better not expect this to have happened so delicately around other stars.  Alan Boss, you may recall, rocked the astronomical community a few years ago by proposing his heretical disk-instability model for the origin of planets, as opposed to the conventional slow gravitational accretion model, which was struggling with the problem of planetary migration (see 03/21/2006).
    Why this evolutionary fascination with explosions?  It’s all they have, folks.  In the absence of a designing intelligence, they have to look at what remains: chaos, chance and violence.  From bangs and booms and flotsam and jetsam the most graceful and elegant examples of design known to man just magically “emerge” by chance.  And they call creationists stupid-stitious.
    At least creationists have more fun.  They are in church praising God, the supreme Architect of our fine-tuned universe, using their whole being – body, mind and emotions – in joyful celebrations with highly-skilled musicians employing finely-crafted instruments, singing out with all their might the glories of One who knows how to employ controlled energy toward purposeful ends:

O Lord my God, when I in awesome wonder,
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made;
I see the stars, I hear the rolling thunder,
Thy power throughout the Universe displayed.
Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art! How great Thou art!

Meanwhile, in dreary laboratories, morose naturalists, their minds lost in imaginary worlds, trying in vain to get their brains to emerge from a series of explosions, drone on:

Talkin’ to myself and feelin’ old,
Sometimes I’d like to quit,
Nothin’ ever seems to fit;
Bangin’ around,
Nothing to do but frown;
Reinin’ in my models always gets me down.

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