October 17, 2008 | David F. Coppedge

Nonsense and Nonscience

For an enterprise that prizes itself on objectivity and careful thought, science occasionally makes some outlandish claims.  Here are some things that slipped past the scientific method into the popular news media.

  1. As good as it gets:  Steve Jones says men have stopped evolving.  Better enjoy what you have, because it’s not going to get any better, reported PhysOrg.  Jones said mutations may come to the rescue.  The short article contained only a small hint of doubt about all this: “That’s good news for those who like the human race just as it is, though perhaps bad news if humans need to evolve to meet some unexpected challenge down the road, the science – as yet not backed up by other research – suggests.”
  2. Monster sex:  Some paleontologists seem to think they can deduce sex appeal from bones.  A particularly monstrous looking horny-headed dinosaur reported by National Geographic is a case in point.  Speaking for the male of the species, the reporter said, “Despite their less-than-cuddly appearance, researchers believe other Pachyrhinosaurs would have found the sharp adornments appealing.”
  3. Close your eyes and listen to nothing:  Science Daily told about physicists who are trying to listen to dark matter.  No one has seen it, but they think maybe if they listen to the acoustic patterns of WIMPs they can hear it.  “Much of our understanding until now has been hypothetical,” the article stated in a quizzical oxymoron.
  4. Buddha for peace:  What is Buddhism doing in the American Medical Association?  PhysOrg advised us on how to ease the stress of bailouts, recession, and depression: “Enter the meditative practice of mindfulness.  Born of Buddhist roots, it’s increasingly recognized as a measure to calm the mind’s chatter and elevate the brain’s thinking and organizational processes.”  Apparently the psychologists didn’t think to give Christians equal time, such as performing a controlled experiment on Philippians 4:4-8.
  5. Arrrrrrgh, capitalism:  Not sure how this story got into Science Daily, but economist Peter Hayes at the University of Sunderland is trying to argue that the corporate business economy – indeed modern democracy – is a legacy of Long John Silver and Blackbeard.  No kidding: “the roots of modern democracy were not in Britain or the USA, but were the ‘corporations’ which were created on pirate ships during the golden age of buccaneering.”  Free-market economists must be shivering in their timbers.
  6. God in the dock:  Apparently Live Science had no qualms about straying into theological and legal matters.  The ostensibly scientific news outlet reported that a judge in Nebraska threw out a man’s lawsuit against God.  On what grounds?  “the Almighty wasn’t properly served due to his unlisted home address.”  The plaintiff, by the way, is a state senator who “skips morning prayers during the legislative session and often criticizes Christians.”  He has 30 days to decide whether to appeal the ruling.  In a case like this, though, to whom does one appeal?

For proof that humans are not the only animals who can ramble on endlessly about things they don’t know, watch this funny clip called “Creature Comforts – What It’s All About” on YouTube by Aardman Animations.

Talk is cheap.  That’s because the supply is greater than the demand.
    These stories illustrate that modern science has become a cult.  Any wild idea gets a free ride, as long as it is un-creationism and anti-Christian.  Show your Darwin Party badge at the door, recite the Standard Hate against creationism, and you can get free access to the press, who will lap up whatever you say like groupies, ask you no questions, and then pass it along unfiltered to the public.  Atheists and socialists get on the fast track to the microphones.
    Except for the last animated goodie, the stories above were all from leading science news outlets.  Remember this when we show you their latest “findings” on evolution.

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