March 11, 2009 | David F. Coppedge

Ye Are the Salt of the Evolution

Salt is good, the good book says (Mark 9:50).  Another good thing it may do for you, according to Science Daily, is act as “Nature’s Antidepressant.”  Presumably it’s hard to have a good mood about a steak with no salt on it.  In the midst of this article about the mood-enhancing effects of salt, an evolutionary tale appeared out of nowhere:

Evolution might have played an important part in the human hankering for salt.  Humans evolved from creatures that lived in salty ocean water.  Once on land, the body continued to need sodium and chloride because minerals play key roles in allowing fluids to pass in and out of cells, and in helping nerve cells transfer information throughout the brain and body.  But as man evolved in the hot climate of Africa, perspiration robbed the body of sodium.  Salt was scarce because our early ancestors ate a veggie-rich diet and lived far from the ocean.

One of the researchers at University of Iowa behind the study also claimed that “our kidneys evolved to become salt misers.”  The body’s need for salt is tied to our appetite for it: “Animals like us come equipped with a taste system designed to detect salt and a brain that remembers the location of salt sources — like salt licks in a pasture,” the article explained.  “A pleasure mechanism in the brain is activated when salt is consumed.”  A Darwin skeptic might wonder what any of this has to do with evolution.

Our bodies are finely adapted to the environment, therefore they evolved.  This is so stupid.  Let’s try this line on lungs:

Evolution might have played an important part in the human hankering for air.  Humans evolved from birds that flew in the air.  Once on land, the body continued to need nitrogen and oxygen because gases play key roles in biochemistry, and in helping nerve cells transfer information throughout the brain and body.  But as man evolved in the hot climate of Africa, chasing game through the Serengeti plains, he got out of breath.  This left our ancestors gasping and panting.  Our lungs evolved to become oxygen misers.

Like magic, evolution just provides whatever complex systems are needed.  Evolutionists cannot escape the clear evidence these things are “designed” to do what they do (see the D word in their statement above), but they turn right around and conjure them up out of evolution, the Un-designer.  Do you realize how complicated a kidney is? (09/24/2008, 06/14/2004).  Salt regulation is a complex process that is tied in to other complex systems, like the bladder (12/11/2001), perspiration (03/02/2007) and central nervous system.  The complexity of the nervous system alone has falsified evolution (see 12/30/2004).
    This kind of storytelling can be applied to anything in the human body, or to plants and animals for that matter.  It had nothing to do with the science behind the observation that humans need and enjoy salt.  To think that our hunger for good seasoned food has something to do with our inner fish evolving in a salty ocean millions of years ago is deliciously silly.  Let’s all sing together our favorite SEQOTW song, We’re out to shame the wizard, the blunderful wizard of flaws (09/05/2008 commentary).
Exercise:  Observe a complex system in the body and make up an evolutionary tale for it.  No intelligence allowed.

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Categories: Dumb Ideas, Human Body

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