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Hear Ye! Directional Sound Enabled by Superfast Neurons

How can you tell where sounds come from? The brain is quicker than the speed of sound between your ears.

Depending on Source, Stem Cells Can Kill or Heal

Stem cells continue to show promise for dramatic healings, but reporters don't always clarify what lived or died to produce the cells. Adult stem cells inhabit all living humans; embryonic or fetal stem cells require a human death.

New Biomimetics Stories

Here are some new ways scientists are imitating plants and animals to understand their designs and make new products.

The Evolution of Penguins

Science reporters are dancing with happy feet about a news story supposedly explaining how penguins evolved.

Human Cloning Is Back

If you thought work on human cloning and embryonic stem cell research went out of style with the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells, watch out. The pro-cloning people, who never lost their lust for toying with human embryos, are back.

Buried Treasure Found Under the Ocean: DNA

The most information-rich medium known to man has been found in abundance under the sea, but man didn't put it there.

Burning Plants Tell Seeds When to Germinate

Forest fire ash is not all useless. It contains signaling molecules that can switch on the next generation of plants.

Bug-Eye Camera, Fly Robot and other Bio-Inspired Tech

Incredible advancements in technology are coming from the imitation of nature, but engineers cannot yet attain animal performance.

How Intricate Patterns Grow in Flowers, Feathers

How does a growing flower bud or feather follicle know where to put the intricate colors and patterns on a mature flower or feather? Scientists are beginning to get partial answers.

Biomimetics Roundup

Here's a quick rundown of news on new technologies emerging from the study of plants, animals, and cells.

What's New in the Primordial Soup?

The bubbling froth percolates with ideas about how life "emerged," each new notion trying to outdo the last in vacuity.

Coelacanth: Making the Most of an Unevolved Fish

The coelacanth genome has been sequenced. Does it show evidence for evolution? Only to those with a good imagination.

Wood You Cellulose for Starch?

Cellulose is the most abundant biomolecule, but how it's made still baffles scientists. Soon, though, you may be able to eat it.

Human and Animal Brains: Uniquenesses and Similarities

Several recent science articles explore what we have in common with animals, and what is unique about the human brain.

The Hunt for Selection in the Genes

One might think that 154 years after Darwin's book about it, natural selection would be empirically obvious. The journal Nature went on a search for it in DNA.
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