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Saturn’s Rings Not Just Young, but “Very Young”

Cassini scientists now have reduced the rings' age by an order of magnitude, as if they formed practically "yesterday."

Geophysics Not Rock Solid Science

With observation, instruments and models, you would think geophysics is hard science.
Triton from Voyager 2, 8/25/89

Planet Party Busted by Triton

Theories can be like parties with tantalizing speculations until big, whopping anomalies spoil the fun.
Cassini at Saturn

Planetary Rings Defy Long Ages

Models of the origin of planetary rings are simulations based on fictions. Real physics cannot keep them billions of years old.

Underground Oceans Can't Last Forever

If Pluto and Enceladus have oceans under the crust, why are they still liquid after billions of years?

Solar System Is Weird Only if It Is Old

To someone who believes the solar system is billions of years old, no wonder its contents look weird.

Planet Recipe Cooked Up

Just add pebbles, stir, and get a planet. Is it real science, or just a game show?

Pluto Is Young

The New Horizons science team is stunned by surface features on Pluto and its large moon Charon that cannot be billions of years old.

Solar System Reversals

The planets keep going around, but theories about them often stop and go backward or sideways. When nothing else works, send in the impactors!

Saturn Rescues Earth: Outer Planet Wonders

How Saturn saved the Earth, and other news from the ringed planet, its family, and other bodies in the outer solar system.

Of Planets and People

Here's a quick tour of the planets to see what's newsworthy.

Every Planet Surprises Secular Astronomers, III: Formation Theories

"Surprise" or "puzzling" are the most common words in news reports about bodies in the solar system. Here are recent examples that discuss the origin of planets.

Astronomers Wrestle with "Endless Mysteries"

Some of the biggest questions in the universe remain completely baffling to astronomers, a leading journal admitted.

Three Strikes Against Uranus

Uranus has an axial tilt of 98 degrees, giving it the appearance of a bulls-eye as it revolves around the sun. Its moons revolve comfortably around the planet’s equator. This unusual arrangement, unique in the solar system, has challenged planetary scientists since its discovery. A new model accounts for it through a series of gentle bumps from impacts as the planet was forming from dust and gas, but how would one ever test such an idea?
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